Content Top Cap

3-D Technology

LG Announces Largest OLED Flat Panel TV

LG has announced its newest and largest OLED TV – a 55” panel with some pretty amazing specs. OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) technology has, in the past, been limited by smaller screen sizes and expensive price tags. However, according to LG’s press release, their 55” panel has overcome these obstacles.

The diodes in OLED TVs self-generate light and send electric signals at a rate far faster than LCD. In turn, the TV has a clearer picture and a wider range of colors. LG uses white OLEDs overlaid with color diodes to produce an “ultra definition” picture. Concerned that all this great technology may lead to a bulkier end product? Think again. The TV is a remarkable 5mm thick – thinner than a pen! Not only will the TV impress techies, but environmentalists will also approve – the diodes in the screen can be turned on or off to account for lower power consumption than most mainstream TVs.  LG’s 55” OLED TV will be unveiled in January at CES 2012 in Las Vegas. There is no word yet on when the product will available for your TV lift cabinet.

LG Announces Largest OLED Flat Panel TV

LG has announced its newest and largest OLED TV – a 55” panel with some pretty amazing specs. OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) technology has, in the past, been limited by smaller screen sizes and expensive price tags. However, according to LG’s press release, their 55” panel has overcome these obstacles.

The diodes in OLED TVs self-generate light and send electric signals at a rate far faster than LCD. In turn, the TV has a clearer picture and a wider range of colors. LG uses white OLEDs overlaid with color diodes to produce an “ultra definition” picture. Concerned that all this great technology may lead to a bulkier end product? Think again. The TV is a remarkable 5mm thick – thinner than a pen! Not only will the TV impress techies, but environmentalists will also approve – the diodes in the screen can be turned on or off to account for lower power consumption than most mainstream TVs.  LG’s 55” OLED TV will be unveiled in January at CES 2012 in Las Vegas. There is no word yet on when the product will available for your TV lift cabinet.

Sony Introduces new 3D PC/TV

If you’re interested in the new 3D TV technology – listen up! Although it may not be an ideal candidate for your TV lift cabinet, the new Sony VAIO L-Series really lives up to its “all-in-one” description.

According to Engadget.com, the desktop PC/TV features a full 3D HD 24” LED touch screen. The system is capable of playing Blu-ray discs, music in surround sound, connecting to the internet and TV and displaying photos. Not to leave the gamers out, games can be played in 3D and the system can also connect to PlayStation 3 via HDMI.

Aside from all the amazing technical features, the L-Series is wall-mountable and includes a wireless mouse and keyboard.  One pair of active shutter 3D glasses is also included as part of the $1,420 price tag. If you’re in the market, pick one up when the L-Series hits stores on July 13th.

Sony Introduces new 3D PC/TV

If you’re interested in the new 3D TV technology – listen up! Although it may not be an ideal candidate for your TV lift cabinet, the new Sony VAIO L-Series really lives up to its “all-in-one” description.

According to Engadget.com, the desktop PC/TV features a full 3D HD 24” LED touch screen. The system is capable of playing Blu-ray discs, music in surround sound, connecting to the internet and TV and displaying photos. Not to leave the gamers out, games can be played in 3D and the system can also connect to PlayStation 3 via HDMI.

Aside from all the amazing technical features, the L-Series is wall-mountable and includes a wireless mouse and keyboard.  One pair of active shutter 3D glasses is also included as part of the $1,420 price tag. If you’re in the market, pick one up when the L-Series hits stores on July 13th.

Consumers are not sold on 3D TV

Recently, I was browsing for the latest technology news and I stumbled across an article that exactly reflected my feelings on 3D TV.  Personally, I think the technology is exciting however I’m not convinced that it is something I’d want for my TV lift cabinet.  Between the price and the extra gadgets (namely, the glasses), it just doesn’t appeal to me. I’m perfectly happy with my HD TV. Apparently, I am not alone.

The article I’m referring to is on CNET.com and it discusses why people do not want 3D TV. The manufacturers say CNET hasn’t done enough to convince consumers that this is something they should have.  However according to CNET, the cost of 3D TVs and having to wear the dreaded glasses is proving to be an unfavorable combination for consumers.

When I watch TV, I want to collapse on the couch, turn on the TV and relax. I might have my laptop on my lap while I simultaneously browse the web. I don’t want to have to put on my 3D glasses to watch my favorite shows. I also like the freedom of going back and forth between my computer and TV. The glasses would complicate my ability to multi-task. Prime example – I often watch TV from my kitchen while cooking or doing dishes and the glasses would interfere. The same concerns I have are shared by many consumers, as is evident in the CNET article.

Do you already have a 3D TV?  If so, I would like to hear from you!  I’m curious to hear what current 3D TV owners think and if they’re happy with their decision to move on from HD TV.  Who knows, I could be persuaded…

 
 
 
Home Shop Our Store RSS Feed
© Copyright 2019   All Rights Reserved.