Content Top Cap

television

Did you watch Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding?

Today is Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding day.  Did you watch it?  If so, apparently you are not alone.  According to Mailonline.com, an estimated 2 billion people tuned in to watch their wedding from around the world.  If you did not get a chance to watch it this morning, we recommend rising the TV lift, turning on the TV, and watching the Royal Wedding highlights tonight.  All the major news networks, CNN, ABC, and NBC will be covering it.

Did you watch Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding?

Today is Prince William and Kate Middleton’s wedding day.  Did you watch it?  If so, apparently you are not alone.  According to Mailonline.com, an estimated 2 billion people tuned in to watch their wedding from around the world.  If you did not get a chance to watch it this morning, we recommend rising the TV lift, turning on the TV, and watching the Royal Wedding highlights tonight.  All the major news networks, CNN, ABC, and NBC will be covering it.

How Does Closed Captioning Work?

Whether the acoustics in your room are not top-notch, or you suffer from a hearing-impairment, closed captioning is a helpful tool that aids in the enjoyment of movies and television. But do you know how it works? Does it come through your television, antenna, satellite dish or cable box? If you have a TV lift cabinet, do you have to do any additional wiring or keep your media players in view to keep your closed captioning abilities? Here are the answers.

The ability for closed captioning is already embedded in the signal sent directly to your television, so every show, television movie and commercial comes with the possibility of closed captioning. In order for you to be able to read it, though, it has to be decoded, and that is done by your TV.

Since 1993, every television manufactured that measures over 13 inches must have a built-in decoder, per the Television Decoder Circuitry Act. The information for closed captioning is hidden in the “line 21 data” of your television signal, which is an invisible vertical line near the bottom of your TV screen.

When you turn closed captioning (CC) on, via your television, the decoder translates the hidden information into text. You may experience a delay in the translation of your captioning if the show is live, as the information is being captioned in real time and sent out with the signal, but prerecorded shows and most commercials will not experience a delay.

If you are watching a movie on a DVD or Blu-ray player, however, the only way to decode the disc is through your media player, not your television set.

So placing your TV in a TV lift cabinet will have no effect on your ability to use closed captioning, and no additional wiring or special TV placement are needed to receive this embedded information.

How Does Closed Captioning Work?

Whether the acoustics in your room are not top-notch, or you suffer from a hearing-impairment, closed captioning is a helpful tool that aids in the enjoyment of movies and television. But do you know how it works? Does it come through your television, antenna, satellite dish or cable box? If you have a TV lift cabinet, do you have to do any additional wiring or keep your media players in view to keep your closed captioning abilities? Here are the answers.

The ability for closed captioning is already embedded in the signal sent directly to your television, so every show, television movie and commercial comes with the possibility of closed captioning. In order for you to be able to read it, though, it has to be decoded, and that is done by your TV.

Since 1993, every television manufactured that measures over 13 inches must have a built-in decoder, per the Television Decoder Circuitry Act. The information for closed captioning is hidden in the “line 21 data” of your television signal, which is an invisible vertical line near the bottom of your TV screen.

When you turn closed captioning (CC) on, via your television, the decoder translates the hidden information into text. You may experience a delay in the translation of your captioning if the show is live, as the information is being captioned in real time and sent out with the signal, but prerecorded shows and most commercials will not experience a delay.

If you are watching a movie on a DVD or Blu-ray player, however, the only way to decode the disc is through your media player, not your television set.

So placing your TV in a TV lift cabinet will have no effect on your ability to use closed captioning, and no additional wiring or special TV placement are needed to receive this embedded information.

Most Soap Opera Ratings on the Rise, Except for One

Soap operas, also called “soaps” for short, are a continuous work of television drama aired in a serial format. The name for these on-going series came from their early days being broadcast as a weekday radio show, which was sponsored by soap manufacturers such as Procter & Gamble, Colgate-Palmolive and Lever Brothers, and played during a time when most of the listeners would be housewives.

By 1976, daytime television became “TV’s richest market,” at least according to Time magazine, primarily due to the soap operas’ dedicated fan base and growth of several series into a full hour slot, instead of a half-hour. The increase in length of the show allowed producers to essentially double the amount of advertising space available for each episode.

However, since the early 1990s daytime soap operas have been on a steady decline. In the 1991-92 TV season, an average of 6.5 million viewers watched “soaps,” but in the 2009-10 TV season, the number dropped to 1.3 million viewers. No new daytime soap opera has been created since 1999, and many have been cancelled. And as 2010 draws to an end, there will only be six soap operas on three TV networks competing for viewers. In 1970, there were 19 different soap operas being aired.

Now that the annual November “sweeps” has ended (a time to measure audience viewership for a variety of different TV shows), an interesting trend among soap operas is starting to emerge. In general, most “soaps” are experiencing an increase in viewership, except one: All My Children, a “soap” that started in 1970. All My Children (AMC) achieved its lowest rating to date among women 18-49, while the other five soap operas saw an increase. In fact, AMC lost about 60,000 viewers since the previous 2010 “sweeps” in July.

Many believe that the general decline in soap opera viewership is attributed to audiences switching to more reality programming as their source of “melodrama.” With popular shows such as Big Brother and Survivor, it is much cheaper to produce a reality TV show than a fictional dramatic one since no full scripts or professional actors are needed for reality shows.

But for the recent rise in soap opera viewership, some believe that there are simply more people at home during daytime hours due to job loss or second or third-shift work schedules. Others say this could be a resurgence in the genre, which will once again bring increased advertising revenue and spawn new series. It will take more than one “sweeps” period to find out, but until then many will stay tuned to their favorite “soap” and their favorite good-looking character.

 
 
 
Home Shop Our Store RSS Feed
© Copyright 2019   All Rights Reserved.